Home banner
Divider
A-Z Index

Quick way to the find the information that you need...

More button
Register with FRAME

Although you do not need to register, any information you provide will be confidential and used only by FRAME to improve the website

Register button
Account Login
Forgot password?

ATLA - ISI
The Journal

 

Alternatives to Laboratory Animals - ATLA

Download latest issue button Download back issues button Subscribe to ATLA
Contact Us

Tel icon

Tel: +44 (0)115 9584740


Tel icon

Fax: +44 (0)115 9503570

Make an Enquiry

Assessment of the Skin Irritation Potential of Chemicals by Using the SkinEthic Reconstructed Human Epidermal Model and the Common Skin Irritation Protocol Evaluated in the ECVAM Skin Irritation Validation Study


Helena Kandárová, Manfred Liebsch, Elisabeth Schmidt, Elke Genschow, Dieter Traue, Horst Spielmann, Kirstin Meyer, Claudia Steinhoff, Carine Tornier, Bart De Wever and Martin Rosdy

Currently, two reconstructed human skin models, EpiDerm™ and EPISKIN™ are being evaluated in an ECVAM skin irritation validation study. A common skin irritation protocol has been developed, differing only in minor technical details for the two models. A small-scale study, applying this common skin irritation protocol to the SkinEthic reconstructed human epidermis (RHE), was performed at ZEBET at the BfR, Berlin, Germany, to consider whether this protocol could be successfully transferred to another epidermal model. Twenty substances from Phase III of the ECVAM prevalidation study on skin irritation were tested with the SkinEthic RHE™. After minor, model-specific adaptations for the SkinEthic RHE, almost identical results to those obtained with the EpiDerm and EPISKIN models were achieved. The overall accuracy of the method was more than 80%, indicating a reliable prediction of the skin irritation potential of the tested chemicals when compared to in vivo rabbit data. As a next step, inter-laboratory reproducibility was assessed in a study conducted between ZEBET and the Department of Experimental Toxicology, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany. Six coded substances were tested in both laboratories, with three different batches of the SkinEthic model. The assay results showed good reproducibility and correct predictions of the skin irritation potential for all six test chemicals. The results obtained with the SkinEthic RHE and the common protocol were reproducible in both phases, and the overall outcome is very similar to that of earlier studies with the EPISKIN and EpiDerm models. Therefore, the SkinEthic skin irritation assay test protocol can now be evaluated in a formal “catch-up” validation study.